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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Journal of Food and Nutrition Sciences
Title Awareness in the Context of Prevalence of Vitamin A Deficiency Among Households in Western Kenya Using a Cross-Sectional Study
Author(s)
Volume 4
Issue 3
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2016
Page numbers 55-64
URL https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mary_Oyunga3/publication/303225478_Awareness_in_the_Context_of_​Prevalence_of_Vitamin_A_Deficiency_Among_Households_in_Western_Kenya_Using_a_Cross-Sectional_Study/l​inks/5739745308ae298602e2c8a4.pdf
Abstract
Increasing awareness of the role of vitamin A (VA) in human health has led to international efforts to eliminate
VA deficiency (VAD) as a public health problem. This paper examined community awareness of existence, signs and
symptoms, causes, control of VAD as well as attitudes, so as to identify knowledge gaps among health workers and
caretakers/mothers. This was a community-based study within the catchment areas served by health facilities offering antenatal
care services in Busia and Bungoma counties in Western Kenya. The study adopted cross-sectional design and purposive
sampling technique. Eight focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with pregnant and lactating mothers and eight key
informant interviews with those in charge of health facilities until saturation. Data was audio recorded, transcribed, coded and
thematically analyzed using ATLAS.ti version 6 software. Most respondents stated having heard about VA/VAD but very few
had the correct knowledge of signs and symptoms, causes, and control of VAD. Their attitudes towards VAD and its control
were generally indifferent with a general belief that they had no control over their circumstances to reduce VAD. Although
VAD was prevalent in the study area, majority of the people in the community had low awareness. This study, therefore,
stresses the need for health education to raise community’s awareness on VAD in such settings in order to augment prevention,
control and elimination efforts.

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