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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - The Journal of Infectious Diseases
Title Routine Immunization Service Delivery Through the Basic Package of Health Services Program in Afghanistan: Gaps, Challenges, and Opportunities
Author(s)
Volume 216
Issue suppl_1
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2017
Page numbers S273-S279
URL https://academic.oup.com/jid/article/216/suppl_1/S273/3935035
Abstract
Background.
The Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) program has increased access to immunization services for children living in rural Afghanistan. However, multiple surveys have indicated persistent immunization coverage gaps. Hence, to identify gaps in implementation, an assessment of the BPHS program was undertaken, with specific focus on the routine immunization (RI) component.
Methods.
A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 on a representative sample drawn from a sampling frame of 1858 BPHS health facilities. Basic descriptive analysis was performed, capturing general characteristics of survey respondents and assessing specific RI components, and χ2 tests were used to evaluate possible differences in service delivery by type of health facility.
Results.
Of 447 survey respondents, 27% were health subcenters (HSCs), 30% were basic health centers, 32% were comprehensive health centers, and 12% were district hospitals. Eighty-seven percent of all respondents offered RI services, though only 61% of HSCs did so. Compared with other facility types, HSCs were less likely to have adequate stock of vaccines, essential cold-chain equipment, or proper documentation of vaccination activities.
Conclusions.
There is an urgent need to address manpower and infrastructural deficits in RI service delivery through the BPHS program, especially at the HSC level.

Related studies

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Mbaeyi, Chukwuma, Noor Shah Kamawal, Kimberly A Porter, Adam Khan Azizi, Iftekhar Sadaat, Stephen Hadler, and Derek Ehrhardt. "Routine Immunization Service Delivery Through the Basic Package of Health Services Program in Afghanistan: Gaps, Challenges, and Opportunities." The Journal of Infectious Diseases 216, no. suppl_1 (2017): S273-S279.
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