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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - BMJ Open
Title Cohort profile: maternal lifestyle and diet in relation to pregnancy, postpartum and infant health outcomes in Vietnam: A multicentre prospective cohort study
Author(s)
Volume 7
Issue 9
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2017
URL https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5589024/
Abstract
Purpose To determine modifiable maternal risk factors for adverse pregnancy, postpartum maternal and child health outcomes in Vietnam.

Participants This prospective cohort study included pregnant women seeking prenatal care at six hospitals in three large cities in Vietnam. After enrolment, eligible participants who gave their consent to participate in the study were interviewed at 24–28 weeks' gestation. Glucose testing was conducted and blood pressure was measured during this period. Each participant will be assessed prospectively during their postnatal visits at delivery, 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months, and will be followed up for 5 years.

Findings to date Of 2248 eligible pregnant women, 2030 were recruited (participation rate 90.3%) between August 2015 and July 2016. All participants completed the baseline assessment. Their mean (SD) age was 27.6 (5.3) years. The mean pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) was 20.2 (SD 2.6) kg/m2, with nearly two-thirds of participants having a normal pre-pregnancy BMI (18.5 to <23.0 kg/m2) and one-quarter being underweight (pre-pregnancy BMI <18.5 kg/m2). Overweight or obese mothers (pre-pregnancy BMI ≥23.0 kg/m2) accounted for 12.8%. No pregnant women reported smoking during their pregnancy while 13.4% of them had continued drinking. 22.8% of participants had hyperglycaemia. Their mean systolic blood pressure was 105.6 (SD 8.2) mm Hg, and diastolic blood pressure was 67.4 (SD 7.5) mm Hg.

Future plans The relationships of maternal lifestyle and nutritional status with the health outcomes of pregnancy, postpartum maternity and infants will be analysed. Meanwhile, participants will be closely tracked to minimise loss to follow-up.

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