Central Data Catalog

Citation Information

Type Journal Article - TAF Preventive Medicine Bulletin
Title Gender, Health, Poverty and Non-rent Payers in a Developing Country: The Human Face behind the Economic and Financial Crisis
Author(s)
Volume 12
Issue 4
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2013
Page numbers 393-408
URL http://www.scopemed.org/?mno=16013
Abstract
Aim: Structural adjustment, increases in world oil and food prices, a proliferation of alternative investment schemes that defrauded people of billions of dollars, double-digit inflation, poverty and banking crises are just some of the issues that have influenced the socioeconomic landscape of Jamaica. The poor, lowly educated, rural residents, non-rent paying and females continue to suffer during the crises. Yet, there has been no study that evaluates the health statuses, health conditions, and characteristics of non-rent paying people. This study is fivefold. It examined 1) health status, 2) health conditions, 3) sociodemographic profile of non-rent paying, 4) factors that explain who non-rent paying people are, and 5) a gender focus.
Methods: This is a secondary data analysis which utilizes data from a national probability cross-sectional survey, with a sample of 6,783 respondents.
Results: Males were 1.4 times more likely to report good-to-very good health status, and peri-urban dwellers were 1.4 more probable to indicate good-to-very good health status. Non-rent paying respondents were single (68 out of every 100); rural dwellers (53 out of every 100); 46 out of every 100 had particular chronic condition; no formal education (62 out of every 100); no health insurance coverage (80 out of every 100); lower class (42 out of every 100), and 15 out of every 100 self-reported an illness. Seventy-seven percent of those with chronic conditions sought medical care compared to 61% of those with acute conditions.
Conclusion: The findings have policy directions, as we continue to monitor health during crises.

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