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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Greener Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health
Title Long Acting Contraceptive Method Utilization and Associated Factors among Reproductive Age Women in Arba Minch Town, Ethiopia
Author(s)
Volume 2
Issue 1
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2014
Page numbers 23-31
URL http://gjournals.org/GJEPH/Publication/2014/July/PDF/070514294 Shegaw et al.pdf
Abstract
Background: Each year, approximately 287,000 women die from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth, with
99% of these deaths occurring in developing countries. Modern contraceptive, particularly long acting family planning
methods are highly effective in reducing maternal mortality by preventing unintended or closely spaced pregnancies.
This paper, therefore, aims to determine the level of utilization of long acting contraceptive methods and explore its
determinants among child bearing age mothers in Arba Minch town, Gamogofa zone, Ethiopia.
Method: Community based cross sectional study was conducted from May15-30 2014 among child bearing age women.
Systematic random sampling technique was employed to select 358 study participants. A pre-tested and structured
questionnaire was used to collect the data. Bivariate and multivariable data analysis was performed using Statistical
Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20 software to assess statistical association.
Result: Long acting contraceptive method utilization was 13.1%. From the socio-economic factors, educational status of
the mother, having functional radio or television at home, positive attitude and higher knowledge were found to be
independent predictors of long acting contraceptive methods utilization.
Conclusion: Utilization of long acting contraceptive method was very low despite multi-pronged activities have been
undertaken throughout the country. Thus, community based health care workers should strengthen information,
education and communication to ensure that women have higher knowledge and positive attitude towards long acting
contraception methods.

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