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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Hospitals of North Showa, Amhara, Ethiopia. Gynecol Obstet (Sunnyvale)
Title Male Partner Role on Reducing Delay in Decision to Seek Emergency Obstetric Care and Associated Factors among Women Admitted to Maternity Ward
Author(s)
Volume 5
Issue 1
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2015
URL http://omicsonline.org/open-access/male-partner-role-on-reducing-delay-in-decision-to-seek-emergency​-obstetric-care-and-associated-factors-among-women-admitted-to-maternity-ward-in-hospitals-of-north-​showa-2161-0932.1000267.pdf
Abstract
Delay in making decision to use emergency obstetric care during pregnancy, child birth and postpartum periods when obstetric complications occur is an important factor for maternal death in developing countries [1,2]. More than seventy percent of maternal deaths are due to the direct obstetric complications occurring during pregnancy, child birth and postpartum periods [3]. Maternal delay in utilization of emergency obstetric care is one of the contributing factors for high maternal mortality [4]. Maternal delays were described as having three levels: delay in making decision to seek care, delay in arrival at a health facility, and delay in receiving adequate treatment [5,6]. But this paper focused on delay in making decision to seek emergency obstetric care which accounts for about 40% of the ‘threedelay model’ [7]. Mothers in developing countries had lower chance for accessing emergency obstetric care due to socioeconomic, social, cultural, female decision making power and ignorance [8-13]. However, the husbands were the principal decision maker to use services for the management of obstetric complications this is because almost all men have social and economic power, and have great control over their partners [4,14-17] Delayed in decision to seek care when the women experience some types of complications during pregnancy, child birth and postpartum periods, is still high [18,19]. This may be due to that, male partner remain poorly informed about women’s health and low levels of participation in prenatal care, delivery and postnatal care attendance [20]. In sub-Saharan African, pregnancy and child birth continued to be viewed as solely a women’s issue [13]. Studies also indicated that in some sub-Saharan countries men generally are decision makers regarding the location at which their spouse should give birth [13-16,21]. However, low level male participation (34%) in prenatal care, delivery and postnatal care attendance [19,22]. And, very little preparation was made like; saving emergency funds (19.5%) and transportation plan (24.2%) [19].

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