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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Healthcare in Low-resource Settings
Title Intestinal parasitic infections in Okada rural community, Edo State, Nigeria: a four year retrospective study
Author(s)
Volume 2
Issue 1
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2014
Page numbers 35-37
URL http://agronomyjournal.it/index.php/hls/article/download/hls.2014.1891/4111
Abstract
Intestinal parasitic infections are associated
with morbidity and mortality worldwide. Data
on prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection
is sparse in rural Nigeria. Against this background,
this study aimed at determining the
prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections
within a four year period in the rural community
of Okada, Edo State, Nigeria. Fecal samples
obtained from 1528 patients (consisting of
740 males and 788 females) presenting with
signs and symptoms of gastroenteritis at the
Igbinedion University Teaching Hospital,
Okada were examined for presence of ova, cyst
and trophozoites of parasites using standard
methods. Patient’s age ranged from 6 months
to 73 years. Study was conducted between 2007
and 2010. The prevalence of intestinal parasitic
infections increased significantly
(P=0.003) from 14.7% in 2007 to 22.5% in
2010. In the study period, gender did not affect
the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection
(P>0.05). Patients within <1-10 years had significantly
higher prevalence of intestinal parasitic
infection. Ascaris lumbricoides was the
most predominant parasitic agent, while
Schistosoma japonicum was the least prevalent.
With respect to parasite, males were
observed to have consistently higher prevalence
of Entamoeba histolytica infection. The
prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection was
observed to significantly increase from 2007 to
2010. Age was a risk factor for acquiring intestinal
parasitic infection. Ascaris lumbricoides
was the most predominant parasitic agent in
all years of study. Control and prevention
measures are advocated.

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