Central Data Catalog

Citation Information

Type Working Paper - UNU-MERIT Working Papers
Title Assessment of skill and technology indicators at the macro-micro levels in Sudan
Author(s)
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2011
URL http://collections.unu.edu/eserv/UNU:216/wp2011-031.pdf
Abstract
In this paper we examine skill and technology indicators at the macro and micro levels in
Sudan. Different from the Sudanese literature, a novel element in our analysis is that we use
new primary data from the macro and firm surveys and we provide a new contribution and fill
the gap in the Sudanese literature by examining five hypotheses on the causes and
consequences of low skill and technology indicators at the macro and micro levels in Sudan.
We verify our first hypothesis that the interaction between the deficient educational system -
caused by low quality of education- and the high share of unskilled workers leads to poor
provision of training; low skill levels; skills mismatch; low transfer of knowledge/external
schooling effect; weak technology indicators and dependence on foreign technologies at the
micro level. We confirm our second hypothesis that the poor local technology
indicators/indigenous capability to build the local technology and heavy dependence on
foreign technology can be attributed to lack of R&D activities/efforts, due to a lack of
funding, low skill levels, weak linkages, lack of networks systems and collaboration between
universities and industry/firms, low transfer of knowledge and a lack of entrepreneur
perspective. We support our third hypothesis that the transfer of knowledge/external
schooling effects is successful at the micro level but unsuccessful at the macro level due to
low educational qualifications and deficient educational and training systems. We confirm our
fourth hypothesis that skill and technology indicators are significantly determined by firm size
and industry. We support our fifth hypothesis concerning the consistency of upskilling plans
at the macro-micro levels. Finally, one advantage and interesting element in our analysis is
that we provide a new contribution to the Sudanese literature, since we explain the causes,
consequences and interaction between the low skill and technology indicators and the transfer
of knowledge. We recommend further efforts to be made to improve skill and technology
indicators and transfer of knowledge at the macro and micro levels which are all essential for
economic growth and development in Sudan.

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