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Citation Information

Type Journal Article - Veterinary World
Title Prevalence of Cryptosporidia, Eimeria, Giardia, and Strongyloides in pre-weaned calves on smallholder dairy farms in Mukurwe-ini district, Kenya
Author(s)
Volume 8
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2015
Page numbers 1118-1125
URL http://erepository.uonbi.ac.ke/bitstream/handle/11295/95909/Shepelo Getrude Peter_Prevalence of​Cryptosporidia, Eimeria, Giardia, and Strongyloides in Pre-weaned Calves on Smallholder Dairy Farms​in Mukurwe-ini District, Kenya.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y
Abstract
Aim: Gastrointestinal diseases are among the leading causes of calf morbidity and mortality in Kenya and elsewhere. This
study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidia, Eimeria, Giardia, and Strongyloides in calves on
smallholder dairy farms (SDF) in Mukurwe-ini District, Nyeri County, Kenya. These infections have been associated with
economic losses by decreased growth rates, decreased productivity, and increased susceptibility to other diseases.
Materials and Methods: An observational study was conducted on 109 farms in Mukurwe-ini District, Nyeri County,
Kenya, where 220 calf fecal samples (each calf at 4 and 6 weeks of age) from 110 calves (1 set of twins) were collected and
analyzed for Cryptosporidia, Eimeria, Giardia, and helminth parasites.
Results: Eimeria oocysts, Cryptosporidia oocysts, and Strongyloides eggs were detected in the fecal samples examined,
but no Giardia cysts were found. The overall period prevalence of Eimeria, Cryptosporidia, and Strongyloides was 42.7%
(47/110), 13.6% (15/110), and 5.4% (6/110), respectively. The prevalence at 4 weeks of age for Eimeria, Cryptosporidia,
and Strongyloides was 30.0% (33/110), 8.2% (9/110), and 3.7% (4/109), respectively, while the prevalence at 6 weeks of
age was 20.2% (22/109), 6.5% (7/107), and 2.7% (3/110), respectively. There was, however, no significant difference in the
prevalence at 4 and 6 weeks (p>0.05).
Conclusion: Findings from this study show that Eimeria, Cryptosporidia, and Strongyloides, are prevalent in the study area
and indicate the need to adopt optimal management practices to control infections in calves.

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