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Citation Information

Type Thesis or Dissertation - Master thesis
Title Gender Differences in Risky Sexual Behaviors and Knowledge of HIV Transmission
Author(s)
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2014
Page numbers 0-0
URL http://sdsu-dspace.calstate.edu/bitstream/handle/10211.3/123829/TaveraGomez_sdsu_0220N_10432.pdf?seq​uence=1
Abstract
Aim: To examine gender differences in knowledge of HIV transmission and factors associated with self-reported condom use among sexually active youth.
Methods: A cross sectional study of participants recruited for the fifth Mortality, Morbidity, and Service Utilization (EMMUS-V) Survey. The public use data set was provided by the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) program.
Results: The majority of participants were 20-24 years old. Out of the 5,541 participants, 62% of males reported condom use during their last sexual intercourse compared to 36% of females. Gender differences in knowledge of HIV transmission were observed. Several factors were found to be associated with self-reported condom use during the last sexual intercourse. For males, the odds of self-reported condom use was higher for males with a primary, secondary or higher education (OR=2.021, 95% CI: 1.147-3.561; OR =5.618, 95% CI: 3.176-9.937; OR=11.20, 95% CI: 4.626-27.116 respectively); middle or high income (OR= 1.826, 95% CI: 1.437-2.320; OR=2.274, 95% CI: 1.803-2.867 respectively); and males who reported knowing a source to obtain condoms (OR= 1.394, 95% CI: 1.030-1.888). For females, the odds of self-reported condom use were higher for females with a secondary or higher education (OR= 3.712, 95% CI: 2.045-6.740; OR=4.991, 95% CI: 2.364-10.539 respectively); middle or high income (OR= 1.270, 95% CI: 1.008-1.600; OR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.615-2.476 respectively); females who had two or more sex partners in the last 12 months (OR= 1.678, 95% CI: 1.153-2.442); and females who reported knowing a source to obtain condoms (OR= 2.738, 95% CI: 1.932-3.879).
Conclusion: It is important to launch condom use campaigns, especially campaigns targeting females. HIV prevention programs should focus on helping youth stay in school, providing access to good economic opportunities, and making resources to obtain condoms readily available.

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