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Type Journal Article - Clinical Infectious Diseases
Title Invasive Salmonella Infections at Multiple Surveillance Sites in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2011-2014
Author(s)
Volume 61
Issue suppl 4
Publication (Day/Month/Year) 2015
Page numbers S346-S353
URL http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/61/suppl_4/S346.short
Abstract
Background. This study reports the microbiological landscape of Salmonella Typhi and invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Methods. Blood cultures obtained from hospital-admitted patients suspected of bloodstream infection (BSI) in 4 of 11 provinces in DRC (Kinshasa, Bas-Congo, Equateur, and Orientale) were processed. Sampling had started in 2007; the results for the period 2011–2014 are reported. Results. Salmonella Typhi and iNTS were cultured from 194 (1.4%) and 840 (5.9%), respectively, of 14 110 BSI episodes and ranked first among BSI pathogens in adults (65/300 [21.7%]) and children (783/1901 [41.2%]), respectively. A total of 948 of 1034 (91.7%) isolates were available for analysis (164 Salmonella Typhi and 784 iNTS). Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis represented 386 (49.2%) and 391 (49.9%), respectively, of iNTS isolates, fluctuating over time and geography and increasing during the rainy season. Adults accounted for <5% of iNTS BSI episodes. Children <5 years accounted for 20.3% of Salmonella Typhi BSI episodes. Among Salmonella Typhi, rates of multidrug resistance and decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility (DCS) were 37.8% and 37.2%, respectively, and 18.3% displayed combined multidrug resistance and DCS; rates of azithromycin and ceftriaxone resistance were 0.6% and absent, respectively. Among NTS isolates, =80% (79.7% of Salmonella Enteritidis and 90.2% of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates) showed multidrug resistance, and <2.5% showed DCS. Combined extended-spectrum ß-lactamase production (blaTEM-1 gene) and azithromycin resistance was noted in 12.7% of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates, appearing in Bas-Congo from 2013 onward. Conclusions. Salmonella Typhi and NTS are major causes of BSI in DRC; their antimicrobial resistance is increasing.

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